October 14

The Empowering Internet Safety Guide for Women

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Have you ever been harassed in the street? Received a crass message on a dating app? Had a coworker make a comment about your appearance that just didn’t sit right?

You’re not alone.

With the #MeToo movement, it’s easy to log onto Twitter or Facebook and see just how many women are victims of sexual harassment. Whether in person or online, women everywhere have experienced it in one way or another. And with all the new ways the internet has opened avenues of communication, online harassment is more prevalent than ever.

According to a study by the Pew Research Center, most online abuse takes place on social media. Although men are also subject to online harassment – which includes name calling, derision, and physical threats – the study found that online, women are more than twice as likely as men to experience sexual harassment.

In addition, more than half of women ages 18-29 report having been sent sexually explicit images without their consent.

This number is only growing, and while 70% of women believe online harassment to be a major problem, not many know how to prevent it. {click the image or title to view the article}

October 14

Bertini joins American Arbitration Association

New York, NY/September 20, 2018-Lisa A. Bertini became an Arbitrator/member of the American Arbitration Association® (AAA®)-International Centre for Dispute Resolution® (ICDR®) arbitration panels. Ms. Bertini will continue with her very active employment practice at her firm, Bertini Law, P.C., in Virginia Beach, Virginia. Ms. Bertini’s practice has been dedicated for the last 30 years to remedying workplace discrimination and to ensure that employees are treated in a non-discriminatory manner, without regard to race, gender, disability, religion, national origin, or sexual orientation. Ms. Bertini has served as Bar Council for the Virginia State Bar and is active in the Virginia Employment Lawyers Association, National Employment Lawyers Association and is an Officer in the Virginia Bar Association Employment and Labor Section Council.

January 6

Virginia Fellow Lisa Bertini quoted in The New York Times

The human resources department at my company (a nonprofit with about 100 employees) is extremely concerned with avoiding hiring factors that might get us into trouble legally. So obviously they don’t ask candidates about age, marital status and so forth. But they also do not look at a potential employee’s social media.

After an offer was made to a candidate for a management position, I was alerted to comments she made on social media that are offensive not only to me, but probably to many of our potential clients. Is there really a good reason to avoid checking social media during the hiring process? ANONYMOUS

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